Contact Info

Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences

University of Toronto Scarborough

1065 Military Trail, EV346

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

M1C 1A4 

Phone: (416) 208-2785

Email: karen.smith@utoronto.ca

Friday
Nov172017

AGU Fall Meeting 2017

I will be presenting my work on stratospheric circulation extremes and minimum Arctic sea ice extent variability at the AGU Fall Meeting this year.

My talk is Monday, December 11 at 8:30am in the Polar Climate: Processes and Predictability I Session in the New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center; 278-279

Monday
Oct192015

AGU Fall Meeting 2015

I am a co-author on two oral presentations at the AGU Fall meeting this year - check us out!

Wednesday, Oct. 16th, 1:55-2:10pm (Moscone West 3006):

Dr. Yutian Wu (Purdue) will be presenting our work on the "Response of the Northern Hemisphere Midlatitude Circulation to Arctic Amplification in a Simple Atmospheric General Circulation Model"

Friday, Oct. 18th, 9:28-9:40am (Moscone West 3008)

I will be presenting my work with Lorenzo Polvani on the "Spatial Patterns of Antarctic Surface Temperature Trends in the Context of Natural Variability: Lessons from the CMIP5 Models"

Friday
Aug012014

AGU Fall Meeting 2014 - Session Announcement

Dear colleagues,

We invite abstract submissions to the session “Decadal-to-Multidecadal
Climate Variability and Change over Antarctica and the Southern Ocean”
at the AGU Fall meeting 2014 in San Francisco (15-19 December 2014):

Session ID#: 2656 - Decadal-to-Multidecadal Climate Variability and
Change over Antarctica and the Southern Ocean

Session Description:
The Antarctic and Southern Ocean region serves as a key indicator and
regulator of anthropogenic climate change. Detection and attribution of
climate change in this region, however, has proven difficult due to
sparse observations, well-known model biases in simulating important
aspects of the climate, and large internal variability that may mask the
response to external forcing. This session aims to better characterize
and understand climate variability and change over Antarctica and the
Southern Ocean on decadal-to-multidecadal timescales. Both observational
and modeling studies are welcome, with preference given to studies that
emphasize the interactions between atmospheric processes (e.g.,
radiative forcings/feedbacks, jet shifts) and changes occurring at the
surface (e.g., surface temperature, sea ice changes). Areas of
particular interest include: novel ways of analyzing/interpreting
observations; model biases and their implications for near-term
predictions/projections; and internal variability (including
teleconnections with lower latitudes) and its importance relative to
greenhouse gas and stratospheric ozone forcing.

Invited speakers (confirmed):
Kyle Armour, MIT
Ian Eisenman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Jennifer Kay, University of Colorado at Boulder
David Schneider, NCAR

The abstract submission deadline is Wednesday 6th August 2014. We look
forward to seeing you in San Francisco!

Sincerely,

Michael Previdi, Karen L. Smith and Kevin M. Grise (Conveners)
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University
Palisades, NY, USA

Sunday
Dec092012

AGU Fall Meeting 2012

Just got back from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. What a stimulating week! I co-convened two great sessions and presented two posters on my recent work. It was really nice to catch up with colleagues and friends and to meet many new people.

Looking forward to next year!

 

- Karen

Monday
Oct292012

Hurricane Sandy

It's aroud 3:30 pm on Monday, October 29th and Hurricane Sandy is blowing steadily outside our apartment walls. We expect the worst to pass over us tonight.

This storm has been dubbed "Frankenstorm" because it is a hybrid storm consisting of Hurricane Sandy travelling northward from the Carribean and an extratropical storm system travelling southeastward from Canada. The two systems are colliding just south of the city of New York. The blocking high over Greenland, characteristic of the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation, is preventing Sandy from taking a more typical hurricane trajectory out to sea.

The media has been comparing Hurricane Sandy to the "Long Island Express", a category 3 hurricane that hit Long Island, New York and New England in 1938 (http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/mandias/38hurricane/)

Here is a link that shows the progress of the storm via satellite imagery: http://weather.unisys.com/satellite/sat_vis.php?image=enh&inv=0&t=cur&region=us

Here is another link from the National Hurricane Center showing model forecasts: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at3+shtml/150352.shtml?5-daynl#contents

- Karen